Good flow gave world record

  • 09 June 2017 |
  • Published in Blog

Good flowI am impressed by the flow at Espa Bolleland, a Norwegian gas station 90 km north of Oslo.

Espa bolleland is a natural stopover for us when we drive to our cabin. We can get freshly baked buns, coffee and a toilet visit if needed. We are not alone: lots of cars passing by, choose to stop here.

What's so amazing with Espa bolleland, is that besides all their visitors, you experience a good flow. They have people guiding the traffic in and out. The delivery of buns and coffee is done in a moment. Even toilet visits go relatively fast even at crowded days.

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Do you overreact?

  • 01 March 2017 |
  • Published in Blog

processcontrol

 

When do you respond to a test result? Do you use facts or intuition? Do your customers decide when to react?

Or maybe you use statistical process control?

How do you react? Do you start looking for a special cause? Or maybe you review the entire process and consider factors that may influence?

It is easy to overreact to normal variation. There will always be variation present.

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Quality every time

  • 30 August 2016 |
  • Published in Blog


quality improvement

I do not intend to start a discussion about which came first, the chicken or the egg. I leave that to others :-)

However, this post is about boiling eggs, and how to always achieve the same quality of a process.

I had a summer job at “Sjømennenes Helsehjem” many years ago, and how to boil the eggs was a hot topic. The customers / residents were not always pleased with the boiled eggs. However, it was complicated to please them since some residents were very happy while others were dissatisfied, with eggs cooked exactly the same way.

They had different preference for quality.

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Which sense react fastest? Vision or hearing?

  • 13 September 2015 |
  • Published in Blog

statistical process control

What do you think?

The best way to find out is to test! It is possible to test it at the Norwegian museum of Science and Technology.

I did an experimental design where I tested age, gender and sense (vision and hearing). My brother in law (35 years), my son (10 years), my niece (7 years) and I (41 years) were volunteers. We took the time we spent on registering sound and light.

My brother in law was a tiny bit faster than me when reacting to sound, followed closely by my son and my niece. For light my brother in law was fastest, then my son, followed by me and my niece. What does this result mean?

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Process control

  • 02 July 2015 |
  • Published in Blog

Achieve Process Control by using SPC!

statistical process controlProcess control is about understanding your process, only then can you control it. To understand the process, you must understand variation.

Six Sigma use SPC (Statistical Process Control) to control processes. SPC is a tool to distinguish between normal and special caused variation.

Why should you distinguish between normal and special cause variation? Because special and normal cause variation requires different approach when identifying causes of variation.

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Variation

  • 02 July 2015 |
  • Published in Blog

Variation; positive or negative?

variationVariation is positive in contexts like "Varied workday," "varied training", "varied lives", etc. For manufacturing companies variation can create headaches and huge cost. Variation of process parameters can cause the product quality to vary more than desired, resulting in customer complaints and quality costs. 

All processes are subject to variation. Some might protest, but if you go into depth of things, you will always find differences. Two "identical" houses will be different if you study them more closely; nails are placed differently, the wood will be slightly different and have branches in different locations, etc. Even identical twins will be a little different when you become familiar enough with them.

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Quality improvement

  • 15 July 2015 |
  • Published in Blog

"The devil is in the detail"

quality-improvementYou achieve quality when you control the important details. When improving quality it is important to consider all the details. However, some details are more important than others. If you can select the details that matter the most and focus on them you will achieve quality. This applies to athletes, manufacturing companies and everyone else. I work mostly with manufacturing companies and use tools within Six Sigma to improve quality. Six Sigma has much in common with Lean, meaning customer focus, process understanding and focus on measurements rather than intuition. A challenge when it comes to quality improvement can be to identify the critical factors and then to control them.

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